Quilts, Coverlets, Rugs (Knopf Collectors’ Guides to American Antiques)

March 11, 2012 by
Filed under: Antiques Rugs 


Quilts, Coverlets, Rugs (Knopf Collectors’ Guides to American Antiques)

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Rug Hooking in Maine 1838-1940

This fresh and scholarly look at a century of rug hooking in Maine demonstrates the significant role non-woven rugs have played in American decorative arts. True Waldoboro rugs are explored in detail and the myth of “Acadian” rugs is explained. Edward Sands Frost manufactured preprinted burlap rug patterns in the mid-19th century that spawned competitions across the country. By the 1880s, summer visitors helped organize cottage industries that turned Maine’s rug-hooking talents into income produ

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4 Comments on Quilts, Coverlets, Rugs (Knopf Collectors’ Guides to American Antiques)

  1. Jerry D. Dennis "shaman skypilot" on Sun, 11th Mar 2012 12:23 am
    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Very pleased at the stylistic manner of presentation, July 9, 2009
    This review is from: Quilts, Coverlets, Rugs (Knopf Collectors’ Guides to American Antiques) (Paperback)

    Very well organized book which placed a great emphasis on the quilters who made them. Quilts were made in the dawn of America. They were the “coverlets” in quaint Colonial Times, but to the average American, the were the “creature comforts” that kept the household occupants “warm and crispy”. Kudos to this Collector’s Addition. Quilts continue to have a strong place in America. This history just proves the diligence, intelligence, imagination, and ingenuity of the American people in creating “art with a purpose”.

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  2. L. Sterling on Sun, 11th Mar 2012 12:53 am
    12 of 12 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Ground breaking history of Hooked Rugs of Maine, April 28, 2008
    By 
    L. Sterling (Ct. USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Rug Hooking in Maine 1838-1940 (Hardcover)

    This book is a serious study of Maine’s Rug hooking tradition. It is well researched and the stories flow easily and informatively. Color photos and paper quality is excellent. Worthy addition to any American textile/rug library.

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  3. Henry Berry "Henry Berry" on Sun, 11th Mar 2012 12:55 am
    10 of 10 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    comprehensive history and study of all aspects of Maine hooked rugs, June 25, 2008
    By 
    Henry Berry “Henry Berry” (Southport, CT) –
    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Rug Hooking in Maine 1838-1940 (Hardcover)

    As Peladeau shows, the field of Maine hooked rugs is surprisingly complex. It’s certainly more involved and more fertile than ones who know it simply as a category of “Maine hooked rugs” realize. The field is given complexity and richness by different periods, rug makers, regions, and skills. The author brings all these elements out by an uncommon depth of research sustained by an intertwined personal and professional interest. She lectures on aspects of the topic, has organized exhibitions, and collects research materials on it.

    Peladeau finds, for instance, that in the 1859 Maine Charitable Mechanic Fair, three rugs were exhibited. But she goes beyond this fact to relate what it says about the field at this moment in its history. That only the few rugs were exhibited indicates “that interest in rugs had waned somewhat…”; and even more, that the small number indicates that interest in rugs at the time “was centered in the Portland area” and other crafts such as quilts and shell box work had come into greater favor. Such continual details and commentary on what they tell about Maine hooked rugs makes for not only informative, but engrossing reading on the field.

    Hooked rugs continue to hold appeal for many collectors and others in the antiques’ field because they are a genuine folk art with old Maine and New England associations. Rug hooking was a traditional skill passed on to young woman. Hooked rugs served practical and decorative purposes in homes before surviving ones became desirable collector’s items as homes became modernized and the frontier and Victorian tastes and skills they represented passed away. This comes through in Peladeau’s text where she relates how rug hooking originated in particular places and spread to others; in her portrayals of individual rug makers or hooked-rug businesses; and detailed descriptions on how the rugs were made, which in some passages are specified to the point of reading like how-to instructions. But the visual matter especially imparts the folk-art aura of hooked rugs which makes them perennially appealing. The diary entries, the old pamphlets, the period photos of woman rug makers and old shops where they were made impart a feel for the combination of ordinariness, industriousness, and inventiveness distinguishing folk art. The many photographs of the farm animals, birds, flowers, patterns, and borders of hooked rugs all in varying degrees of primitive style impart this essential quality of such rugs too.

    Peladeau’s book is for collectors and the like looking for a discriminating understanding of Maine hooked rugs. The rugs always have an appeal for their folk-art appearance and association with Americana and traditional New England crafts. But for readers whose appreciation is enhanced by knowledge of weaves, recognition of regional variations, awareness of stages of development, and the like, Peladeau’s book is for them.

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  4. S. Lecure on Sun, 11th Mar 2012 1:47 am
    10 of 10 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Rug Hooking in Maine 1838-1940, April 19, 2008
    By 
    S. Lecure (Bristow, VA USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Rug Hooking in Maine 1838-1940 (Hardcover)

    I just received this book and initially thumbed through it. I almost sent it back – based only on the pictures of old rugs. I am so used to books based on contemporary rugs that my first thought was that these old rugs were somehow dull, but when I slowed down to read the history I had second thoughts. I started from the beginning of the book and read through it then studied the pictures. It is a wealth of information and an asset to any serious traditional rug hooker’s library.

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